FAQs

Potato FAQs

Category: Potato FAQs
Because these are fresh potatoes, how long they last will depend more on how they are stored. For this reason, many stores choose not to have a best by date or expiration date added to the packaging. As long as the potatoes are not really soft or breaking down, you should be good to go. For the best and longest storage possible, you’ll want to store your potatoes in a cool, dark place. The optimum storage is 45-55° F, and potatoes store best in the dark. Keeping them this way should allow them to last for several weeks, depending on storage conditions. Storing them in the refrigerator allows the potatoes’ starches to break down into sugars, which may change the flavor of the potatoes, so if you must refrigerate them, use them up within a few weeks to get the best flavor possible!
Category: Potato FAQs

Because these are fresh potatoes, how long they last will depend more on how they are stored. For this reason, many stores choose not to have an expiration date added to the packaging. As long as the potatoes are not really soft or breaking down, you should be good to go.

For the best and longest storage possible, you’ll want to store your potatoes in a cool, dark place. The optimum storage is 45-55° F, and potatoes store best in the dark. Keeping them this way should allow them to last for several weeks, depending on storage conditions. Storing them in the refrigerator allows the potatoes’ starches to break down into sugars, which may change the flavor of the potatoes, so if you must refrigerate them, use them up within a few weeks to get the best flavor possible!

Category: Potato FAQs

Since our potatoes are fresh produce, we recommend that you eat and enjoy them right away. If you do wish to freeze them, we recommend that you boil or roast them, let them cool and then freeze them. They will hold for a little while, although you will experience a bit of a watery consistency with them after thawing.

Category: Potato FAQs

Yes, all of our Farmer’s Promise potato varieties are gluten free.

Category: Potato FAQs

All of our Farmer’s Promise brand produce is produced from natural, non-GMO seeds.

Category: Potato FAQs

The greening you’re experiencing occurs when potatoes have been exposed to too much light, either natural or artificial (grocery store lighting), that gives the potatoes a sort of “sunburn.” While greening is a result of light exposure, the visible greening can be delayed. Potatoes exposed to light may be packaged and continue to green beyond our last inspection point. We make every effort to avoid this, however, sometimes it’s unavoidable.

You can cut the green out of the potatoes and use the rest, but eating the green portion of the potato can give a very bitter flavor. Here’s some additional information if you’d like to see more: www.potatogoodness.com/potato-greeningfact-check.

Category: Potato FAQs

Potatoes’ nutritional guidelines are produced by the USDA and FDA are standardized for all potatoes–regardless of their size. Since potatoes within the packaging vary slightly in size and density, the nutritional facts are based on an estimate of how many potatoes will be in the package, but does not account for potatoes that may have a higher density and account for more weight within any given package.

Here’s some additional nutritional information.

Category: Potato FAQs

Farmer’s Promise has conventional and organic potatoes. If you have a bag of organic potatoes, it will clearly be labeled organic on the package or label.

Category: Potato FAQs

How do I select the perfect potato?

  • Potatoes should be firm in texture
  • Potatoes should not have any visible greening
  • Potatoes should be free of cuts, bruises and sprouts
Category: Potato FAQs

It’s best not to wash your potatoes before storing. Dampness can promote early spoilage.

Category: Potato FAQs

Storing potatoes in the refrigerator allows the potatoes’ starches to break down into sugars, which may change the flavor of the potatoes If you must refrigerate them, use them up within a few weeks to get the best flavor possible!

For the best and longest storage possible, you’ll want to store your potatoes in a cool, dark place. The optimum storage is 45-55° F, and potatoes store best in the dark. Keeping them this way should allow them to last for several weeks, depending on storage conditions.

Category: Potato FAQs

Occasionally potatoes get exposed to a warm temperature change, which causes them to “wake up” and sprout. They are still safe to eat – just pick them off and you should be good to go!

Category: Potato FAQs

For the best and longest storage possible, you’ll want to store your potatoes in a cool, dark place. The optimum storage is 45-55° F, and potatoes store best in the dark. Keeping them this way should allow them to last for several weeks, depending on storage conditions.

Storing them in the refrigerator allows the potatoes’ starches to break down into sugars, which may change the flavor of the potatoes, so if you must refrigerate them, use them up within a few weeks to get the best flavor possible!

Category: Potato FAQs

Uncooked peeled potatoes will start to discolor quickly due to exposure to air.

To prevent this, place cut or sliced potatoes in a bowl of cool water until ready to use (up to 2 hours) to keep the nutrients in the potato.

A few notes:

  • It won’t affect the quality of the potato, but many find it unappealing.
  • Refrigerating cut potatoes uncovered will not stop this process.
Category: Potato FAQs

The packaging is designed to minimize light exposure and prevent greening.

Onion FAQs

Category: Onion FAQs

High heat makes onions bitter. When sautéing onions, it’s best to use low or medium heat.

Category: Onion FAQs
  1. On a cutting board, remove the stem end of the onion and trim the root but leave it otherwise intact.
  2. Cut the onion in half through the stem and root, remove the outer layer of onion skin, and place the onion cut side down.
  3. Cut parallel slices of the desired thickness vertically through the onion from the root toward the stem end without cutting completely through the root end.
  4. Make a single horizontal cut on a small onion or two horizontal cuts on a large onion, again without cutting through the root end.
  5. Turn the onion and cut slices perpendicular to the other slices to produce diced onion. Make the thickness of these slices similar to the thickness of the vertical slices.
Category: Onion FAQs
  1. On a cutting board, remove the stem and root ends of the onion.
  2. Cut the onion in half through the stem and root, remove the outer layer of onion skin, and place the onion cut side down.
  3. Working with one half at a time, place the onion cut side down and with one of its round edges facing your knife.
  4. Angle your knife at 45 degrees from the cutting board and begin slicing into matchstick-size pieces.
  5. Continue cutting in a radial manner, gradually changing the angle of the knife with each cut.
  6. By the time you reach the middle of the onion, your knife should be at a 90-degree angle to the cutting board. When you’re most of the way through, and it begins to feel a little unstable, flip over the onion and continue slicing.
Category: Onion FAQs
  • Onions should be firm with no soft spots
  • Onions should have little to no scent
  • Onions should be free of cuts, bruises & blemishes
Category: Onion FAQs
  1. On a cutting board, remove the stem end of the onion and trim the root but leave it otherwise intact. Peel away the outer skin.
  2. Position the onion in the center of your cutting board with the stem end facing your knife and cut slices of the desired thickness.
  3. Stop when you reach the root end and discard it. You can now separate the onion slices into rings

TIP: If you’re uncomfortable slicing the round onion, hold the onion so the stem end is facing you, then cut away a ¼” inch piece from the side of the onion so that is lays flat on the cutting board.

Category: Onion FAQs

Rub your hands with lemon juice

NOTE: Be careful if you have a cut on your hand; this will cause it to burn a bit

Category: Onion FAQs

Whole Onions (uncut & unpeeled)

  • Store in a cool (45-55° F), dry, dark place with plenty of air movement
  • They can keep up to 4 weeks if stored properly

Peeled onions

  • Store whole peeled onions in the refrigerator

Cut onions

  • Store cut onions in an airtight container, bag or wrapped in plastic wrap in the refrigerator
  • Cut onions are good for up to 7 days when stored properly
Category: Onion FAQs
  • Chill onion for 30 minutes
  • Cut off the top and peel the outer layers leaving root end intact
    • The root end has the highest concentration of sulphuric compounds that make your eyes tear
Category: Onion FAQs

Red Onions

  • Commonly used in salads & sandwiches
  • Best raw onion!
  • Raw; Grilled; Roasted; Pickled

Yellow Onions

  • All-purpose & most popular; great for caramelizing; great for soups & stews
  • Lightly cooked; Sautéed; Grilled; Baked; Caramelized

White Onions

  • Popular for Mexican & Southwest cuisine
  • Raw; Grilled; Sautéed; Lightly Cooked
Category: Onion FAQs

One medium onion equals about 1 cup chopped onion.

Some of the information for the FAQs is from Potatoes USA and National Onion Association.